Micah Melnyk and Doug Forsythe of the Canadian Delegation in the main Plenary session.

Micah Melnyk and Doug Forsythe of the Canadian Delegation in the main Plenary session.

Canada’s lead negotiator for the UN climate talks answers your questions again. You can ask Michael Martin your question by commenting here.

  1. What is the length of commitment period that Canada is looking at for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol?
  2. What research initiatives do you think Canada should be focusing on in light of these negotiations?
  3. And beyond Copenhagen, how are we going to kick-start the technology revolution that we are going to need? 
  4. Is Canada looking at the gender perspective in climate adaptation discussions and policies?
  5. I heard a rumor that you joined Twitter in the last 24 hours… is this true?

Read his answers here.

What is the length of commitment period that Canada is looking at for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol?

There are two options I think: 5-year and an 8-year – The latter because so many countries have framed their goals around 2020. We are not sure that the commitment period drives the moment at which you begin review procedures. The commitment period plays an accounting role on how you structure your budgets. For example, the last time we agreed we’d start reviewing Kyoto 8 years prior to the end of the commitment period – and that’s why we launched negotiations on further commitments in 2005.

What research initiatives do you think Canada should be focusing on in light of these negotiations?

Research and development includes a vast scientific agenda. We know that there’s also an immense research agenda around clean tech and the interesting aspect now is how you actually broaden that agenda to engage developing countries so that you’re sharing knowledge effectively – some is more advanced, some is more focused. It’s largely about the way in which we share globally and get past some of the challenges that seem to have impeded the commercialization of clean technologies.

And beyond Copenhagen, how are we going to kick-start the technology revolution that we are going to need? We obviously have many on the shelf – i.e. renewable energy sources in Canada. What about next-generation technologies?

We were talking about this in the Major Economies Forum, in two ways: 1) putting robust domestic regulatory policies in place, and 2) thinking about how we want to collaborate more globally.  Canada recently put 1 billion towards low-carbon technology: 650 million of that is for carbon capture and storage, and some of that is for a scale up of research and development.

Is Canada looking at the gender perspective in climate adaptation discussions and policies?

Yes, certainly. That is a significant issue in the adaptation discussion. Our working on it includes going beyond the traditional groups and trying to build out a broader group discussion including gender.

I heard a rumor that you joined Twitter in the last 24 hours… is this true?
Yes…. [Confused look, blushing cheeks].

You can fallow Michael Martin @chiefnegotiator.

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